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Posts Tagged ‘Pothole’

3 Reasons To Repair Potholes As Quickly As Possible

Friday, February 8th, 2019
Learn three reasons why it’s so important to repair potholes as quickly as possible.

Learn three reasons why it’s so important to repair potholes as quickly as possible.

Potholes can cause a lot of damage to cars or pedestrians in your parking lot, and it is crucial to repair a pothole as soon as possible. If your parking lot is full of potholes, it is not only a terrible first impression for new customers, but it also puts you at risk of being liable for an accident. Continue reading for three essential reasons why you should always repair potholes on your property as quickly as possible. (more…)

Benefits of Pothole Repair

Friday, September 22nd, 2017
Pothole repair is a simple and necessary measure to restore the look and overall function of your pavement.

Pothole repair is a simple and necessary measure to restore the look and overall function of your pavement.

Potholes aren’t just eyesores, but they can also become a pain to motorists who sometimes swerve their vehicles to avoid the bumps and damages that potholes cause. Usually the result of water damage or gradual deterioration over time, they show neglect and an apparent lack of maintenance on your property. Pothole repair can be a simple and necessary measure to restore the look and overall function of your pavement. Consider the benefits of doing the work now versus the possible need of a total replacement later. (more…)

Pothole Repair: It’s a Bigger Job Than You May Think

Friday, June 24th, 2011

It’s a hole in the road. How hard can it be to fill a hole, right? Well, you might be surprised. Pothole repair is tough work and requires a trained crew and some specialty equipment. This article from PaveManPro.com explains the lengthy repair process.

How to repair a pothole:

1. With a pavement saw or pneumatic hammer, cut the outline of the patch, extending at least 0.3 m (I ft.) outside of the distressed area. The outline should be square or rectangular with two of the sides at right angles to the direction of traffic.

2. Excavate as much pavement as necessary to reach firm support. If a patch is to be an integral part of the pavement, its foundation must be as strong or stronger than that of the original roadway. This may mean that some of the sub-grade will also have to be removed. The faces of the excavation should be straight and vertical.

3. Trim and compact the sub-grade.

4. Apply a tack coat to the vertical faces of the excavation.

5. Backfill with the asphalt mixture. Using a shovel or skid steer loader place the mixture directly from the truck into the prepared excavation. The maximum lift thickness largely depends upon the type of asphalt mixture and the available compaction equipment. Asphalt concrete can and should be placed in deep lifts, since the greater heat retention of the thicker layers facilitates compaction. From a compaction standpoint, patches using asphalt concrete can be backfilled in one lift. However, when placing a patch that is deeper than 3 cm (5 in.) it is often useful to leave the first lift 2.5 to 5 cm (I to 2 in.) below the finished grade, making it easier to judge the total quantity of mixture required for the patch.

On the other hand, patches constructed with mixtures containing emulsified or cutback asphalt must be placed in layers thin enough to permit evaporation of the diluents that make the mixture workable.

6. Spread carefully to avoid segregation of the mixture. Avoid pulling the material from the center of the patch to the edges. If more material is needed at the edge, it should be deposited there, and the excess raked away. The amount of mixture used should be sufficient to ensure that the after compaction the patch surface will not be below that of the adjacent pavement.  On the other hand, if too much material is used a hump will raise.

7. Compact each lift of the patch thoroughly. Use equipment that is suited for the size of the job.  A vibratory plate compactor is excellent for small jobs, while a vibratory roller is likely to be more effective for larger areas. When compacting the final lift (which may be the only lift), overlap the first pass and return of the vibratory roller or plate compactor to no more than 5 cm (6 in.) on to the patch on one side. Then move to the opposite side and repeat the process. Once this is accomplished, proceed at right angles to the compacted edges, with each pass and return overlapping a few inches on to the uncompacted mix. If there is a grade, compaction should proceed from the low side to the high side to minimize possible shoving of the mix.

8. When adequate compaction equipment is used, the surface of the patch should be at the same elevation as the surrounding pavement. However, if hand tamping or other light compaction methods are used, the surface of the completed patch should be slightly higher than the adjacent pavement, since the patch is likely to be further compressed by traffic.

9. Check the vertical alignment and smoothness of the patch with a straightedge or string line.

So next time you complain about that pothole down the street not getting fixed or next time you think to yourself, “hey, I could do that in half the time,” remember that pothole repair is not a quick fix. Properly patching a pothole takes time, know-how, and a lot of energy.

If you have any questions, contact PTG Enterprises by calling 410-636-8777 or click here

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How to Identify Pavement Distress

Thursday, June 2nd, 2011

Unfortunately, even the best pavement is not indestructible. Heavy traffic usage and weather changes, along with several other outside factors, can lead to pavement distress, which is noticeable physical damage on roads or sidewalks. If not dealt with quickly, pavement distress can lead to more serious problems, all of which can significantly shorten the lifespan of your pavement.

But how can you spot pavement distress in time? This article from eHow.com explains how you can quickly identify pavement distress.

1.   Assess cracks on the surface of the pavement. Alligator cracking appears as a network of cracks, forming a pattern somewhat like the skin of an alligator or wonky squares. As the U.S. Department of Transportation outlines in its “Pavement Distress Identification Manual for the NPS Road Inventory Program, 2006 -2009,” the severity of the distress can be measured. It is considered low when the width of the crack is less than 1/4 inch in width. However, the alligator distress is serious when the cracks are more than 3/4 inch wide.

2.   Check the pavement’s surface for long strips of cracking. These are ruts that run either along the length of the pavement or sideways across the surface. In places where the cracks are more than 3/4 inch in width, the distress is considered serious and can buckle the pavement, causing bumps. Hot weather can cause this type of pavement distress.

3.   Identify gouged-out areas or dips on the surface of the road. Pavement distress is characterised by potholes. These are concave holes on the surface, which are a nuisance for drivers. The holes can cause punctures in tires, gather water and lead to further cracking.

4.   Look for dark square or rectangular patches of asphalt on the pavement. Distress can be identified by finding discolored areas where potholes or previous distress marks have been filled or covered over. The replacement asphalt causes a dark patch to be seen. Cracking, ruts or potholes can often be seen in proximity to the patching, which is indicative of pavement distress.

5.   Crouch down and look across the surface of the pavement. Identify two lines of depressions in the road’s surface. If these are in the direction of the wheel paths, this distress is called rutting. Rutting occurs when continuous use of the pavement by heavy vehicles causes the surface to sink. It is classified as severe when the depressions are greater than 1 inch below the surface of the pavement.

Once you have identified pavement distress, it is time to repair the damage. There are several products available that allow you to do the job yourself, but if you want to ensure your pavement is properly fixed, it is probably best to call a professional.

If you have any questions or if you would rather leave the repair work to the professionals, contact PTG Enterprises by calling 410-636-8777 or click here

Potholes and Repair

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011

How do potholes happen?

Potholes are severe manifestations of pavement fatigue cracking resulting in a total loss of asphalt integrity in a localized area. This creates a hole in the road. It is not uncommon to have a pothole extend through or into the aggregate stone base. Potholes occur when water seeps into cracks in the asphalt surface of a road or driveway. This water will freeze and expand in the cold weather. A pothole forms when dirt and gravel are forced out leaving a hole. The ice will eventually melt away, leaving a pothole.

How can you quickly fix a pothole in your driveway?

For a very wide crack or pothole, shovel in packaged cold-patch blacktop, leveling large areas with an iron rake. Compact the material with a rented tamper or the end of a 4-by-4. Add more material until the hole is slightly overfilled. Cover it with scrap plywood and drive over it.

If you are looking to fix a pothole on a commercial parking surface or if you want a top quality repair, it is probably best to call a professional.

What does My Pavement Guy have to say on the subject?

In the winter, potholes should be temporarily filled with a cold-patch mix material to protect against vehicle damage and/or lawsuits. Please note that this is only a temporary fix and left untreated correctly the pothole will most likely reappear. In the spring and summer months, potholes should be permanently patched.

Full-Depth Patching is the most common type of patching. This is where the pavement is completely removed in the troubled area and replaced. These areas are usually suffering from severe distress and / or sub-base failure. This is a permanent fix.

For professional pothole repair, contact PTG Enterprises – My Pavement Guy by calling 443-463-1536 or click here today!